Tips & Tactics

During the Crunch, Pack a Lunch

During the Crunch, Pack a Lunch

By J. Dement

Public land can be one of the most challenging places to hunt white-tailed deer. The same can be said about heavily hunted places with a high deer-hunter-to-deer ratio. I have been hunting on public land since 1975, and I have learned a thing or two about both deer and deer hunters. The first thing I learned is when deer hunters get cold, they get ... READ MORE

Coming Home Alive

Coming Home Alive

By Rene Borne

Photo: A fist-sized survival item gives outdoorsmen a sense of comfort in the backcountry. Tip Editor Tim H. Martin knows all too well — shown here moments before getting slammed by an ice storm. Thirty years of elk hunting in the mountains of Western Washington have taught me an important lesson every hunter should practice: Be prepared... READ MORE

It’s in the Bag

It’s in the Bag

By Joe Palermo

Several years ago, I started carrying an ordinary household item that has proved itself valuable for a variety of hunting purposes: heavy-duty plastic garbage or leaf bags. Initially, I used the bags to tote meat out of the woods. I’d quarter my deer and place the venison in them to keep dirt and leaves off the meat. This also kept blood off... READ MORE

Open Field Yardage Markers

Open Field Yardage Markers

By Neal Gagner

Open fields always seem to be my favorite places to hunt. Where I live, the deer appear at the woods edge, then enter the hay or cornfields where I then have to figure out the yardage. In the deep woods, I can use my rangefinder to mark objects such as trees, rocks and stumps. But open fields rarely have distinguishing features to mark with a rang... READ MORE

Ice Water Venison Tenderizer

Ice Water Venison Tenderizer

By Jack McCullough

“Gamey” is an adjective I frequently hear for describing the taste of venison. I hear this complaint from hunting and nonhunting friends alike.  Years ago, on an evening hunt, I harvested a doe and hung it up overnight. Unfortunately, I had an accident later that evening which prevented me from finishing my butcher work on the doe... READ MORE

Warmers in Extreme Cold

Warmers in Extreme Cold

By William Sharp

My tip is a follow up to a 2013 Buckmasters Tip of the Week submitted by bowhunter Stacy Vaccaro. Stacy explained how she uses disposable hand and toe warmers on her arms and shoulders to keep her muscles loose enough to draw her bow in the extreme cold of Wisconsin. Buckmasters Tip Editor Tim H. Martin added how he learned to put hand and toe wa... READ MORE

When Jays are Squawking . . .

When Jays are Squawking . . .

By Donald Spotts

One of my favorite tips is something I suppose many hunters think about, but rarely talk about. Next time you hear blue jays making a fuss, remember this phrase: “When jays are squawking, something’s walking.” Blue jays consider deer to be intruders, and they often follow them just like they will a cat or other predator. Their ru... READ MORE

The Mock Intruder Trick

The Mock Intruder Trick

By Ed Rogers

Every hunter has his or her own method of convincing big bucks to come to their stand. Here is my favorite method of luring them in. Whenever I take a buck, I remove the tarsal glands. These are the dark, smelly patches of fur located inside the big bend of each hind leg. Some hunters call them hock glands. I scrape off any meat tissue, rub a littl... READ MORE

Gun Slings: To Remove or Not to Remove?

Gun Slings: To Remove or Not to Remove?

By Joe Palermo

Photo: Joe Palermo took this gorgeous Kentucky buck in November of 2015. Joe has contributed numerous tips to Buckmasters Tip of the Week, including this week’s thoughts on detaching gun slings. Gun slings are one of the handiest things most hunters use, yet we rarely give them much thought. You don’t always need to have a sling, but tr... READ MORE

Wild Game Buttermilk Bath

Wild Game Buttermilk Bath

By Rod Robert

Venison isn’t the only meat that sometimes has a gamey flavor, and that seems to be a recurring theme among people who eat wild game. For example, where I’m from, we have sharp-tailed grouse. They are practically inedible unless you do something to help them out. I have a simple trick that helps improve my wild game cooking, and it work... READ MORE

Sometimes it's the bow.

Sometimes it's the bow.

By Tim H. Martin

Sometimes it's the Indian. When I first started working for Buckmasters in 1997, it didn't take long to realize I was going to learn a lot from the people around me. One of the first really great tips I picked up was from former Buckmasters editor Russell Thornberry. He basically overhauled my bow form and taught me how to reduce torque and prevent... READ MORE

Bow Sight Covers

Bow Sight Covers

By Victor Ortiz

Last summer, I read a Buckmasters Tip of the Week about using different types of koozies as covers for riflescopes. This made me happy, because I have been doing something similar for a long time, except I use koozies to cover and protect my bow sights. A koozie, in case you are not familiar, is an insulating sleeve used to keep a canned or bottled... READ MORE

How A Crossbow IS NOT Like A Rifle

How A Crossbow IS NOT Like A Rifle

By Bryan Zabitski, TenPoint Crossbow Technologies

Photo: Today’s high-performance hunting crossbows, like the TenPoint Nitro XRT pictured here, shoot arrows at high speeds, but still do not “shoot like rifles.” With the rise of a new generation of high performance hunting crossbows, the temptation to compare crossbows to rifles has become almost irresistible. Each year, technolog... READ MORE

De-stinkify Your Hands

De-stinkify Your Hands

By Tim H. Martin

When I think back to the time I shot and field dressed my first buck, I can still remember the frustrations of trying to get the stink off my hands. That was nearly 40 years ago. Mind you, these were extra funky rutty hands, because I’d somehow managed to grab the buck’s hock glands while dragging it out of the woods — the classic... READ MORE

Be Still, My Beating Heart!

Be Still, My Beating Heart!

By Mike Bolinder

I can’t speak for other bowhunters, but after sitting stone still in a treestand for several hours and a shooter buck comes walking in, my heartbeat goes from zero to 100 in about three seconds flat! There’s nothing wrong with that reaction because it means you are excited and having fun, however, an accelerated heart rate can mean big ... READ MORE

Copyright 2020 by Buckmasters, Ltd.

Copyright 2020 by Buckmasters, Ltd